#133543
Sam-I-Am
Participant
    @sam-i-am

@cascade505 122440 wrote:

what do you guys think about egyptian hieroglyphic lettering on shoulder/arms?

Depends, are you Egyptian?


210 inking hours and counting.

Tattoos are for the living. Tombstones are for the dead. Get a tattoo for yourself!

#133517
gawj1512
Participant
    @gawj1512

@cascade505 122440 wrote:

what do you guys think about egyptian hieroglyphic lettering on shoulder/arms?

Are you Egyptian? If the answer’s no, I don’t think so… I never get why people who aren’t chinese/egyptian/hebrew etc. get writing in those letters, but it’s your body, you decide. Don’t worry what other people think!

#133518
gawj1512
Participant
    @gawj1512

This is going around my lower arm later this week, my kids names though, can’t ever get bored of those

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#134920
cascade505
Guest
    @

Cool! thanks for the advice as well 🙂

#135806
linus1691
Participant
    @linus1691

You could think of getting it in two lines
Would look good

#141923
anonymous
Participant
    @anonymous

I will say this, I got my wrist tattoo (cliche, I know) with text (even worse!) because there was no image that could portray this word. Hell, the word is the art to me. As a lover of languages, I disagree that words are not art.

I have the word “thole” tatooed on my wrist. A cursory search would tell you it means “Endure (something) without complaint or resistance; tolerate.” But it is so much more. In Old English thole was a nasty curse. The sort of curse you gave someone when you hated (and I mean HATED) them. You wanted their day to suck so hard that burning hot oil on their nuts would seem like an improvement. You wanted them to suffer. It was vicious and vulgar. But by the time we moved into the Elizabeathen era with Shakespeare and Middle (soon to be modern) English it became a blessing for your most beloveds. You wanted them to suffer, yes, but only because suffering was now a virtue. You wanted them to overcome that suffering with dignity and become a better person because of what they endured.

Now tell me, how do you put all of that into a picture and how can you claim that word is not art? Does anyone else know what it means or why it is fascinating to me? No. But that doesn’t mean it is not beautiful.

#141925
Sam-I-Am
Participant
    @sam-i-am

@npaggett 130160 wrote:

I will say this, I got my wrist tattoo (cliche, I know) with text (even worse!) because there was no image that could portray this word. Hell, the word is the art to me. As a lover of languages, I disagree that words are not art.

I have the word “thole” tatooed on my wrist. A cursory search would tell you it means “Endure (something) without complaint or resistance; tolerate.” But it is so much more. In Old English thole was a nasty curse. The sort of curse you gave someone when you hated (and I mean HATED) them. You wanted their day to suck so hard that burning hot oil on their nuts would seem like an improvement. You wanted them to suffer. It was vicious and vulgar. But by the time we moved into the Elizabeathen era with Shakespeare and Middle (soon to be modern) English it became a blessing for your most beloveds. You wanted them to suffer, yes, but only because suffering was now a virtue. You wanted them to overcome that suffering with dignity and become a better person because of what they endured.

Now tell me, how do you put all of that into a picture and how can you claim that word is not art? Does anyone else know what it means or why it is fascinating to me? No. But that doesn’t mean it is not beautiful.

Welcome to the forum!

That’s fine if you want to go through life explaining your tattoo to people that have never heard of the word “thole”.


210 inking hours and counting.

Tattoos are for the living. Tombstones are for the dead. Get a tattoo for yourself!

#141926